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lesson plans

LESSON PLANS         

Mr. Beck’s information for the April 6 to May 8, 2020 time frame.

NOTE:  Physics class information is toward the bottom.

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NOTE TO ALL CLASSES:   In order to get credit you MUST have the following information at the top of your assignment:

          First and Last Name, Subject/Class, Week of Assignment, Lesson Number

             example –  Sherlock Holmes, 2nd hr. Physical Science, April 6-10,  Lesson #1

You can send the above information along with your completed assignment to my e-mail “dbeck@wpsok.org.” (as a photo in a pdf file if necessary).

Also, when you send an assignment via e-mail, be sure to put your first and last name AND your hour in the subject line.

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Mr. Beck’s Physical Science – Hello to everyone.  I hope you are well and everything is O.K.  P.S. Joke is toward the end.

APRIL 6-10

LESSON #1

Enter the website “mesonet.org/”. find “Weatherford” on the map and click it.  On the left you should find the following info. for Weatherford:

  Place, Time, Temperature, Dew Point, 24-hour Rainfall total, Wind Speed and Direction, and the Forecast for “Today”, “Tonight”, and “Tomorrow”.   NOW, RECORD EACH OF THE THINGS JUST MENTIONED.

Next, click on the “More Maps”.  On the left tool bar click “Station Meteograms”.  IF it is not showing the “Weatherford’ information, click on “Change Mesonet Site” and then click on “Weatherford”.  Now it should show the “Meteogram for Weatherford”.  The TOP GRAPH shows the TEMPERATURE.  Look on the left side of the graph to see the temperature range.  NOW, determine and RECORD these 2 things:

     1. What was the highest temperature on the graph and when did it occur?

     2. What was the lowest temperature on the graph and when did it occur?

Next, look at the LAST GRAPH.  It shows how sunny or cloudy the day has been.  Determine and RECORD which of the following statements best describes what you see:

    A. Completely sunny (all orange color, no/very little gray)

    B. Mostly sunny (mostly orange color, some gray)

    C. Partly sunny (about ½ orange and ½ gray)

    D. Mostly cloudy (mostly gray, some orange)

    E. Overcast (all gray, no/very little orange)

NOW, DO THE THINGS ABOVE FOR 3 CONSECUTIVE DAYS AND TURN IN THE RECORDED INFORMATION TO MR. BECK by Friday, April 10.  This will complete LESSON #1.

 

LESSON # 2

Enter the website “owlcation.com/stem/Tornado-Pictures”.  Number, answer, and RECORD the following:

  1. What is a tornado?

  2. Where in North America do most tornadoes occur?

  3. What are the 2 types of waterspouts?

  4. What is the only continent on earth to have never experienced a tornado (as far as anyone knows)?

  5. How are tornadoes graded/rated?

  6. The Fujita scale ranges from what number to what number?

  7. How strong is an F 0 tornado and what kind of damage can it do?

  8. How strong is an F 1 tornado and what kind of damage can it do?

  9. How strong is an F 2 tornado and what kind of damage can it do?

​10. How strong is an F 3 tornado and what kind of damage can it do?

11. How strong is an F 4 tornado and what kind of damage can it do?

12. How strong is an F 5 tornado and what kind of damage can it do?

13. What is a storm that creates 6 or more tornadoes called?

Now, PROPERLY SUBMIT YOUR ANSWERS TO MR. BECK by APRIL 10.  This will complete LESSON #2.

 

April 13-17

 Lesson # 3 

  Go to “mesonet.org”.  On the Okla. map shown, use your pointer arrow to locate the following cities/towns that you will need to remember and look up on other maps:    Boise City, Woodward, Weatherford, Altus, OKC (East), Tulsa, McAlester

  Now, above the map of Okla. click “Past Data”.  Next, click “Mesonet Past Data and Files”.  Then, click “Mesonet Long-Term Averages – Maps”.

Now for this Map #1, you need to select the following in the blanks at the top:     Year – 2020;  Period – January;  

  Product Catagory – Air Temperature;  Product – Maximum Air Temperature

Now, be sure and click “Display Map”.   You will use this map to answer questions for “Map #1”.

  Now on you answer sheet for Map #1, be sure to include the following information at the top of your answer sheet:

                 Your first and last name, Physical Science, April 13-17, Lesson #3

Now, write down “Map #1” and record the following data:

     Year and Month – 2020 January

     Product Category – Air Temperature

     Product – Maximum Air Temperature. 

     Boise City – _________________________

     Woodward – _________________________                                                     Put  Maximum  air temperatures

     Weatherford – ________________________                                    <-------      in  these  blanks

     Altus –  ________________________                                                               for  these  towns

     OKC (East) – _________________________                                                    from  Map. # 1

     Tulsa – __________________________

     McAlester – _________________________

Now for Map #2,  find and write down the following data:

     Year and Month – 2020 January

     Product Category – Air Temperature

     Product – Minimum Air Termperature

Now, be sure and click “Display Map”.

Now from Map #2, record these Minimum Air Temperatures for the same cities.

You should now have successfully recorded the maximum air temps (from Map #1) and the minimum air temps (from Map #2) for each of these cities in January of 2020.

Now, do the same thing for February of 2020 (Maps #3 & #4) and for March of 2020 (Maps #5 & #6).  (Total of 6 data sets).

Note:  When you submit your answers to Mr. Beck’s e-mail address (dbeck@wpsok.org), be sure and include all necessary info. at the top of the answer sheet (First and last name, class name and hour, April 13-17, Lesson #3)    AND    have your first and last name and “Lesson #3” stated in the e-mail subject line.  Due by Friday, April 17, 2020.

 

LESSON # 4

     Go to the following web-site and answer the questions:

           weather.gov/oun/tornadodata-county-ok-custer

1. How may TOTAL tornadoes have been recorded in Custer County (all on the front and back of page including the top of the front         page)?

2. Look at the data for the first tornado recorded in 1912.  List the following things:

     Date, number killed, number injured, path location

3. What are 3 unusual/notable things about the data for the April 9, 1944 tornado?

4. Give all the information about the first tornado that was recorded near Weatherford.

5. The F-Scale (Fujita Scale) started being used to measure tornadoes in 1950.  Give the data for the first tornado in Custer County         to receive an “F-2” rating.

6. Give the data for the first recorded “F-3” Custer County tornado.

7. Give the data for the only known “F-4” tornado to have ever been recorded in Custer County.

8. What was the date and location of the last “F-3” tornado to have occurred in Custer County?

9. How many tornadoes listed on the entire sheet have been at or near Weatherford?

10. Since 1950, how many tornadoes have been designated as either an “F-0” or an “EF-0”?

11. Since 1950, how many tornadoes have been designated as either an “F-1” or an “EF-1”?

12. Since 1950, how many tornadoes have been designated as either an “F-2” or an “EF-2”?

13. Since 1950, how many tornadoes have been designated as either an “F-3” or an “EF-3”?

14. Since 1950, how many tornadoes have been designated as either an “F-4” or an “EF-4”?

15. Since 1950, how many tornadoes have been designated as either an “F-5” or an “EF-5”?

16. How many total deaths  have been recorded in Custer County since 1912  due to tornadoes?

17. Why do you think many more deaths occurred before 1970 due to tornadoes than after 1970?

18. How many  total injuries  have been recorded in Custer County since 1912 ?

19. The path length (in miles) of most tornadoes is fairly short.  However, there are 4 recorded tornadoes shown with path lengths            more than 25 miles.  Give the date and the path length of these 4 tornadoes.

20.  How many deaths and how many injuries have been recorded in Custer County in the last 30 years

Due by Friday, April 17, 2020.

Now, be sure and have all the following info at the top of your “LESSON #4” answer sheet:

    Your first and last name, your class name and hour, April 13-17, LESSON #4

Also, be sure to have your first and last name and “Lesson # 4” in the subject line when you send it to Mr. Beck’s e-mail address.

 

April 20-24

Lesson #5.    Weatherford Monthly Averages

             At the top of your answer sheet be sure and include:

          Your first and last name, class and hour, April 20-24, Lesson #5

First, go to the following web site and then the subsequent steps:

    mesonet.org

    Past Data

    Mesonet Past Data + Files

    Station Monthly Summaries

Next, it will ask you to “Choose a Year” and “Month”.  You choose  “2019” and “April”.

Next, it will ask you to “Choose a Site”.  You choose “Weatherford”

Now, BE SURE AND CLICK “Get Summary”.

Look at the April 2019 data (Table #1) and find the line toward the bottom of the table that says:

        ← Monthly Averages → 

Now, using that line of information, construct an answer sheet that fills in the following blanks:

      April 2019

      Weatherford

      Monthly Averages for the following:

      Temperatures:     Max  _____________.     Min _______________   Ave _______________

      Dew point (degrees F) __________________

      Pressure (in):    STN ______________________.        MSL _____________________

      Wind Direction ________________

      Speed Ave _________________

      (mph)  Max ________________

      Solar (MJ/m squared) _________________________

Now, do the same thing for May 2019 (Table #2) and each month after it including March 2020 (Table #12). 

So when you finish, you should have 12 tables of information running from April 2019 (Table #1) to 

     March 2020 (Table #12).   Submit this data for Lesson #5.

Also, be sure to have your first and last name AND Lesson #5 on the e-mail subject line that you send to Mr. Beck 

  at:        dbeck@wpsok.org

 

Lesson #6.   Volcanoes

           At the top of your answer sheet be sure and include:

               Your first and last name, class and hour, April 20-24, Lesson #6

First, go to the following web-site:                owlcation.com

Now, click “stem”

Next, click “geology”

Next, click “4 Different Types of Volcanoes According to Shape”

Read the volcano information.  Then do the following things and answer the following questions:

1. Give the following for each of the 4 types of volcanoes:

    A. Name/type of volcano

   B. Shape

   C. Height

   D. Slope

2. Give a one sentence description of an extinct volcano AND list an example.

3. Give a two sentence description of a dormant volcano AND list an example.

4. Give a three sentence description of an active volcano AND list an example.

5. Which type of volcano is considered the most dangerous?

6. What is the name, location, and height of the tallest volcano in the world?

7. What is the name of the tallest volcano in the solar system, and on what planet is it located?

8. What’s the name of the most volcanically active object in the solar system and how many volcanoes 

      does it have?

(Note:  Problems 9-13 are below the definitions)

Some definitions:

   Caldera – A large bowl-shaped depression formed at the top of a volcano when the ground under it collapses

   Lahar – A fast-moving mudflow made of ash and water

   Laze – A mist containing hydrochloric acid that forms when molten lava flows into sea water

   Pahoehoe – A type of lava that forms a thin, wispy crust when it hardens

   Pyroclastic flow – A high temperature mixture of hot ash and lava fragments that moves out of a 

        volcanic eruption at a high rate of speed

   Tephra – Any sized material that is ejected during a phyroclastic explosion

   Vog – A fog which contains sulfur dioxide that forms near lava vents

   Volcanic bomb – A mass of molten lava that hardens after it has been ejected into the air by an eruption

Now, write down BY HAND the following definitions for #9-13:

9. Define lahar.

10. Define laze.

11. Define pyroclastic flow.

12. Define tephra.

13. Define vog.

Now, submit your answer sheet to Mr. Beck at:     dbeck@wpsok.org

Also, be sure to put your first and last name and “Lesson #6” on the subject line of the e-mail.

 

April 27-May 1, 2020

Lesson #7 – Mohs Mineral Hardness Scale  

  At the top of your answer sheet be sure and include:

    Your first & last name, class & hour, April 27-May 1, 2020, Lesson #7

Go to the following web site and then complete the work below:

bigbeadlittlebead.com/guides_and_information/guide_to_using_mohs_hardness_scale.php

Now, read the third and fourth paragraph under Mohs’ picture.

SO, minerals that are harder (have a higher Mohs number) will scratch minerals that are softer (have a

    lower Mohs number).

Now, complete the table with the correct mineral name for each of the Mohs numbers:

(Note:  Ignore the “Absolute Hardness” numbers underneath each mineral description)

1 = ___________________________________               6 = __________________________________

2 = ___________________________________               7 = __________________________________

3 = ___________________________________               8 = __________________________________

4 = ___________________________________               9 = __________________________________

5 = ___________________________________             10 = __________________________________

Now, answer the following questions about the 10 minerals in the Mohs scale listed above:

11. Which mineral can be scratched by all the other minerals on the Mohs scale? _____________________________

12. Which mineral can NOT be scratched by any of the other minerals on the scale? __________________________

13. Which mineral can be scratched by quartz and topaz but not my apatite? ________________________________

14. Which mineral can NOT be scratched by fluorite but can be scratched by orthoclase? ______________________

15. What 3 minerals can scratch quartz? _____________________________________________________________

16. Is gypsum a hard or a soft mineral? ______________________________________________________________

17. What 2 minerals on the Mohs scale are just harder than gypsum? ______________________________________

18. Which of these minerals is produced by biological organisms? ________________________________________

19. Which mineral is a natural allotrope of carbon? _____________________________________________________

20. Which mineral is used as an abrasive in sandpaper? ________________________________________________

21. Which mineral is used in talcum powder? _________________________________________________________

22. Which mineral is one of the most common minerals in the earth’s crust? _________________________________

Be sure and include your first and last name AND the lesson number on the subject line of the e-mail and submit it to

Mr. Beck at:                  dbeck@wpsok.org

 

Lesson #8 Gem Stones other than Diamond and Topez

  At the top of your answer sheet be sure and include:  

                First & last name;  class & hour;  April 27-May 1, 2020;  Lesson #8

Go to the following web site:

  bigbeadlittlebead.com/guides_and_information/guide_to_using_mohs_hardness_scale.php

After the Mohs hardness scale information, find the section entitled “Common Gemstones Against Mohs

   Scale of Hardness Chart”.

In this section you will see information for 19 different gem stones.  You are to pick 10 gem stones.  After having

chosen them, you are to fill in the following information for EACH of the 10 stones that you selected:

Gem Stone #1

    Name: __________________________________

   Mohs Hardness Number: _____________________

     (Note:  Do NOT USE the “Absolute Hardness” number given”

   List 2 interesting/important facts about this gem stone:  ______________________________________________

   __________________________________________________________________________________________

  ___________________________________________________________________________________________

  ___________________________________________________________________________________________

When you have completed the above for EACH of the 10 gem stones you chose, put your first and last name and the lesson number on the subject line of the e-mail and send it to Mr. Beck.              dbeck@wpsok.org

 

May 4-8, 2020

Lesson #9 – Mineral Structures / Tessellation

   A mineral has a repeating atomic structure or crystalline pattern. In mathematics, a “tessellation” refers to a polygonal pattern that is repeated (in theory) infinately.  So a tessellation can be used to represent the crystal pattern for a certain mineral.

Go to the website:       mathisfun.com

Click on “Geometry”

About 2/3 the way down the page, click “Tessellation Artist”

Now I will give you some instructions about what to do and how to do it.

NOTE:  On the upper right, the “Undo” button will remove the last thing that was put on the screen (helpful if you

  make a mistake or don’t like the last thing).  The “Clear” button will wipe the screen clean (good if you want to start

  over, but not good if you wish to keep your pattern).

On the left tool bar, set the “W” to “4” AND the “H” to “4” (this will make your pattern 4 wide and 4 high)

Now, click the box with the blue circle (this will make it a pattern of circles)

Now, click and drag in the middle of the screen and see what happens.

NOTE:  Dragging the red and blue dots on the screen will change the arrangement of the pattern.

Make a pattern that you like (and be sure each circle overlaps at least 2 others in the pattern).

Once you get a pattern that you like, look on the left set of options.  Under the box with the blue circle is a  box

  with a funny shaped “blob” in it.  If you click the blob box, it will now let you do some coloring on your pattern.

  Find a color that you wish to use and click on it.   Now, click on the pattern where you wish that color to appear (and

  do it in a symmetrical way, where it is even and not random throughout the picture).

  NOW, click on 9 other colors and fill the pattern symmetrically and completely (with the total 10 colors).

TAKE A PICTURE OF THIS COLORED PATTERN.  THIS WILL BE ONE OF FOUR PATTERNS YOU WILL COMPLETE, TAKE A PICTURE OF, AND SEND TO MR. BECK FOR LESSON # 9.

Pattern (Picture) #2

On the left options, click the box with the red  hexagon.

Under that box, go to the “n” line and move the dot to the number “4” (now this pattern will have 4-sided shapes).

Now make and color this pattern of squares AND take a picture of it (to send with the other 3 patterns).

  Be sure each square overlaps at least 2 other squares in the pattern.

Pattern (Picture) #3

Go to the “n” line and move the dot to the number “6” (now this pattern will have 6-sided shapes).

Make and color the pattern and take a picture of it.  (Be sure to overlap each hexagon with 2 or more others).

Pattern (Picture) #4

Go to the “n” line and move the dot to the number “8” (now this pattern will have 8-sided shapes).

Make and color the pattern and take a picture of it. (Be sure to overlap each octagon with 2 or more others).

NOW,

  send Mr. Beck the 4 seperate, colored patterns (circles, squares, hexagons, & octagons) and this is LESSON #9.

Note: Be sure to put your full name and the lesson number in the subject line of the e-mail.

 

Lesson #10 – Lightning and Thunder   

  Be sure and include your full name, class and hour, May 4-8, 2020, and Lesson #10 on top of your paper

Go to the web site:    weather.gov

Under “Education” toward the bottom of the page click “Jetstream”

On the upper right, click “Lightning”

Answer the following over lightning and thunder.

1. NASA research indicates that lightning flashes about how many times a second worldwide?

2. Ice, hail, and semi-frozen water droplets known as what are essential to lightning development?

3. Strong winds called what transport small liquid water droplets from the lower regions to the upper regions of

    a thunderstorm?

4. What is “soft hail” or “graupel”?

5. What kind of electrical charge does the base of a storm have?

6. What kind of electrical charge does the top of a storm have?

7. In the world of electricity, opposites do what?

8. The _______________ is a very good insulator that inhibits electric flow.

9. A __________________ amount of (electrical) charge has to build up before lightning can occur.

10. Most lightning occurs where?

11. What kind of electric charges gather along the ground under a thunderstorm?

12. What is the “stepped leader”?

13. What is a “streamer”?

14. Why are tall objects often struck by lightning?

15. What is “positive lightning”?

16. How much electricity can occur in a positive lightning strike? (in amperes and volts)

17. How far away can positive strikes occur from precipitation?

18. Positive lightning is usually composed of how many strokes?

19. Negative lightning is usually composed of how many strokes?

20. What is “bipolar” lightning?

21. What is thunder?

22. How hot can lightning be?

23. How do lightning deaths compare to those of tornadoes or hurricanes in the U.S. normally?

24. Tell me 2 places to go that are safer when lightning is striking.

25. Tell me 2 places NOT TO GO when lightning occurs.

26. What are 2 smart thing TO DO when it is stormy?​

27. What are 2 things NOT TO DO when it is stormy?

28. “When Thunder Roars, Go _____________________”.

29. A lightning bolt can be fatal up to __________________ feet away from the point of strike.

30. The average lightning bolt is about ________________ degrees F in temperature.

 

 

  My best to you and yours.    Mr. Beck.          beck@wpsok.org     772-3385,  room 125

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Joke of the Day # 1 – Why will a Chevy 3500HD, a Ford F-350, and a Dodge Ram 3500 never “let you down”?

                                    Because each of them is a “pick up”.

Joke of the Day #2 – Did you hear about the red ship that collided with the blue ship?  All of the passengers got “marooned”.

Joke of the Day #3 – Do you know what big, bad sea monsters eat?   Fish and “ships”.

Joke of the Day #4 – Do you know how the fair English lady bid good-bye to the gentlemanly Sir Lancelot?  “Good knight”.

Joke of the Day # 5 – Why did the computer start wearing glasses? It wanted to improve its web “site”.

Joke of the Day #6 – What is a trombone’s favorite piece of playground equipment?   The slide.

Joke of the Day # 7 – Why should you never trust a balloon?  Because they are full of hot air.

Joke of the Day #8 – What did one wall say to the other?  “I’ll meet you at the corner !”

Joke of the Day #9 – Why do some people eat snails?   Because they don’t like fast food.

Joke of the Day #10 – Why did the girl take a ladder with her to school?   She attended a high school.

Riddle of the Day – What never leaves its corner yet travels around the world?    A postage stamp.

Joke of the Day #11 – What do you get when you cross a trumpet, a drum, and a tire?    A rubber band.

Joke of the Day #12 – An elderly lady had 8 jobs to be done around the house.  So she hired a man to do odd-jobs.

          Unfortunately, he only did job numbers 1, 3, 5, and 7.

Joke of the Day #13 – Did you hear about the lady who bought her husband a new refridgerator for his birthday?

      You should have seen his face light up when he opened the door !!!

Joke of the Day #14 – Do you know why a person’s nose can’t be 12 inches long?  Then it would be a foot.

Joke of the Day #15 – Do you know how much pirates pay for their corn?  A Buccaneer.

Joke of the Day #16 – A tomato, a faucet, and some lettice ran a race.  Who won?  At the end, the lettice was a head, the tomato 

      was trying to “catsup”, and the faucet was still running.

Joke of the Day #17 – What meal can never be served hot?      Chili

Joke of the Day #18 – Why did the baseball player have to go to jail?    For stealing all the bases.

Joke of the Day #19 – Why did the broom show up late to work in the morning?   Because it over swept.

Riddle of the Day – What occurs twice a week but only once a year?  The letter “e”

Joke of the Day #20 – Do you know what the tree said to the dentist?  What do you mean I need a root canal ?!!!!

Joke of the Day #21 – Do you know what the veterinarian said to the horse?     Why the long face?

Joke of the Day #22 – Do you know why you can’t ever keep a secret at a bank?    There are too many tellers.

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Mr. Beck’s Physics Class 

NOTE:  If you have “SWIM” materials that you were studying, please get them returned to me via the office with a note on them that they are to go to “Mr. Beck – SWIM materials”.  Thanks for your cooperation and help with this.

       Hello to you all.   There is good news in “Physics Land”.  Mr. Beck, Dr. Paul G. Hewitt, and Conceptual Physics are all alive

and well !!!!!   So we can continue our glorious journey through “Physics Land” via the internet.       Please see the note at the top of this page about submitting info to my school e-mail address  “dbeck@wpsok.org”.    We have 5 weeks left (with 2 Lessons per week).   First week is April 6-10.   We will be using 2 websites which are:

      1.        conceptualphysics.com

      2.       conceptualacademy.com/textbook/conceptual-physics

April 6-10 (Lessons #1 + #2)

     For the first lesson (Lesson # 1), view the first website and watch videos # 60, 87, 91, 93.  Write a summation for all of them on the same page(s) and send to my school e-mail (being sure to include your name, subject, lesson #, and week of assignment).

    For the second lesson (Lesson #2), view the second website and watch all the videos in chap 20 over “Sound”.  Write a summation for all of them on the same page(s) and send to me with all of the correct info. so I know who and what it is.

April 13-17 (Lessons #3 + #4)

    For lesson #3, view the second website and watch all the videos in chap 21 over “Musical Sounds”.  Repeat the above directives.

    For lesson #4, view the second website and watch all the videos in chap 23 over “Electric Current”.  Repeat the process.

April 20-24 (Lessons #5 + #6)

    For lesson #5, view the second website and watch all the videos in chap 26 over “Properties of Lignt”.   This one has some really interesting stuff in it.  (Just for fun,  go to “sciencekids.co.nz”, then click “Images”, then click “Illusions” for some great optical illusions.)   After summarizing ch 26, submit your work.

   For lesson #6, view the second website and watch all the videos in chap 27 over “Color”.  Repeat the process.

April 27-May 1 (Lessons #7 + #8)

    For lesson # 7, view the second website and watch all the videos in chap 34 over “Nuclear Fission and Fusion”.  Repeat the process..

    For lesson #8, view either website.  Watch whichever videos you wish to study (30-40 minutes worth).  Write a summation and submit.

May 4-8 (Lessons #9 + #10)

    For lesson #9, view either website.  Watch whichever videos you wish to study (30-40 min).  Summarize and submit.

    For lesson #10, view either website.  Watch whichever videos you with to study (30-40 min).  Summarize and submit.

 

After that, smile for the camera in your cap and gown !!!!!